The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett. This logo is a trademark of "The Great Unknown, The Great Explorers" and "The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett" - All Rights Reserved

The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett. This logo is a trademark of "The Great Unknown, The Great Explorers" and "The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett" - All Rights Reserved

 

Gran Vilaya

Ruined City Found in Jungle in Peru," New York Times, July 7, 1985.

The Gran Vilaya ruin sites and surrounding area, estimated at over 100 square miles.

The well-known explorer, Gene Savoy, has discovered a "lost" city some 120 square miles in area in the jungle-covered mountains of Peru. This citadel, called Gran Vilaya, is located about 400 miles northeast of Lima on a 9,000-foot mountain ridge. Savoy said:

"...the city's buildings ran along the ridge for at least 25 miles. He said the expedition calculated that there were 10,350 stone structures in the defensive network along the ridge and 13,000 other stone buildings in three major city layouts. The stone structures, some measuring 140 feet in length, were built atop terraces that go up the mountain slopes like stairs, he said. He described them as 'complex units of circular buildings with doorways, windows, and niched walls.' The walls, he said, 'soar up as high as a 15-story building."

The city was built by the Chachapoyas Indians about 1,000 years ago. The Chacahpoyas empire is dated at 800-1480 AD. The Incas, who finally conquered them, told Spanish explorers that the Chachapoyas were tall, fair-skinned people!

 

Stretching for miles along a ridge of the Andes called "the jungle's eyebrow," the ancient city of Gran Vilaya is perhaps the largest complex of ancient ruins to be identified in our time. In immensity and grandeur, this vast Chachapoyan city in the mountain jungles of northeastern Peru certainly surpasses any other ruin known in that country.

  Ignored by official history, the Sachapuyas occupied part of what is known today as the Amazonas and San Martin departments. Their legacy, not to mention the region's vast tourism potential, deserves a more in-depth look.   The structure known as the tintero or ink bottle is thought to have been used as a receptacle for catching rain water.

Its discoverer, Gene Savoy, named the ancient metropolis in 1985 for the nearby river Gran Vilaya, but he believes it is actually the citadel fortress which Incan chronicles call "Rabantu" --the indomitable refuge where Manco, the last Inca ruler, hoped to build a new life for his nation, and where he was fleeing with his people when the Spanish armies finally captured him.

Over the past ten years, explorer Gene Savoy and other Foundation members have studied and surveyed the vast metropolis. During this time, the Foundation has also shed much light on the legendary Chachapoyas, the pre-Inca builders of this city, a mysterious Caucasoid people whose existence in pre-Columbian America continues to baffle historians and archeologists.

Once you sign on as a Virtual Voyager, or become a full-fledged member of the Andean Explorers Foundation & Ocean Sailing Club, you too will be able to make a "Grand Tour of Peru" on your own Grand Voyage and keep up on the new findings in the Expedition Journal.

The department of Amazonas was the place of origin of the Chachapoyas culture know as Kuelap or Sachapuyos. This city was under the Inca domination since 1475 with the Inca tupac Yupanqui. After the Spanishs dominated to the Incas.  

  The rhomboid designs in these friezes inside the Kuelap fortress are a trademark of the Shacapuya civilisation.

Gran Vilaya in The Explorers Journal

The Explorers Club, headquartered in New York City, will be publishing an abridged version of the long-anticipated story of the discovery of the ancient Chachapoyan metropolis of Gran Vilaya by Gene Savoy. The article will be fully illustrated and will contain the first published map of the Gran Vilaya ruin sites and surrounding area, estimated at over 100 square miles. The article is the result of the expedition report from the Gran Vilaya-El Dorado VI Expedition of 1994, the AEF & OSC's final journey into the mysterious cloud city of the Chachapoyas. Look for the article in the Spring 1998 issue of "The Explorers Journal."  

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