The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett. This logo is a trademark of "The Great Unknown, The Great Explorers" and "The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett" - All Rights Reserved

The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett. This logo is a trademark of "The Great Unknown, The Great Explorers" and "The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett" - All Rights Reserved

 

Dead Horse Camp (Fawcett's Camp)

 

The sketch-map originally drawn by Commander George M. Dyott and recently 

improved by Emmanouil Lalaios

 

Reference for the summary of the following article was taken from:

The Geographical Journal Volume LXXIV of 1929 "Dyott's Expedition in Search of Colonel Fawcett" page 517 & 540

 

The position of the Dead Horse camp has been discussed in Geographical Journal vol. 71, p. 178 of February 1928 and in the Geographical Journal vol. 73, p. 540 of June 1929.

 

It has been discussed that Colonel Fawcett in his last report to North American Newspapers Alliance (NANA) from the Dead Horse Camp, which was later renamed to "Fawcett's Camp", he gave the latitude 13 degrees 43' South of the Equator, which was the exact position of this area (where Fawcett lost his horse by shooting it during his seventh expedition in 1920) and not 11 degrees as he stated in his last letter to his wife, which means that 

either

....a mistake was somewhere as it was physically impossible to reach 14 degrees south from Bakari Post in time Fawcett stated that he was on the road 

or

....it was mentioned intentionally by him in his letters with the purpose of misleading others who might try to follow the path.

 

Besides, we must not forget that Fawcett before he starts his last expedition, he mentioned that if he, with all the experience he had in the wilderness, could not manage to return, no one else should try to follow his path as there will be no chance to find him or his objective.

 

Colonel Fawcett's last letter dated 29 May 1925 begins:

 

"Here we are at Dead Horse Camp, latitude 11 degrees 43' South and longitude 54 degrees 35' West, the spot where my horse died in 1920"

 

The Dead Horse Camp was on the Batovi River, an affluent of the Xingu next west of the Kulisevu or Kuluseu River that can be seen in the sketch-map below,

 

This was confirmed later on (in 1928 after Dyott's return from the search expedition) by Mr. Ernest Holt, an ornithologist from the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh who accompanied Colonel Fawcett in his 1920 expedition. Mr. Holt, however, had no precise position for the camp.

 

In 1925 a 'camarada' (native helper), a Bakari Indian named Bernardino accompanied Colonel Fawcett to the camp on the Kuluseu in approximate latitude 12 degrees 50'. On the way, Fawcett re-occupied the camp where, according to Bernardino, his horse slipped in a crossing of the river Batovi in 1920 and broke its leg, so that it had to be shot.

 

In 1928 Bernardino pointed out the place to Mr. Dyott and recalled the fact that ha had camped there before with Colonel Fawcett in 1925.

 

According to this evidence, the position of the Dead Horse Camp given in Colonel Fawcett's last letter is erroneous and it seems possible that he wrote 11 degrees for 13 degrees.

 

From Dead Horse Camp, it is said by Indian reports that Fawcett had visited en route a large lake between the two rivers Kuluseu and Kuluene.

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